Film
THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE (1974)
, Dir.
THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE (1974)

A few years ago, I was invited to a Texas Monthly panel wherein four experts and myself determined the ten greatest Texas films of all time.  We actually came to terms fairly quickly on nine films, but for the tenth, fellow invitee Joe Bob Briggs and myself were unyielding.  We were alone in our adoration of THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE and were unwilling to yield on the point. I’ll quote myself from that roundtable discussion turned Texas Monthly article: “A lot of people have argued this is the most influential horror film of all time, and at the same time, there are Texas themes that resonate through it. There is the death of quintessential Texas industries, of the cattle industry falling apart, and that’s what drove this family to cannibalism. There is this lurking darkness of rural Texas. The movie was made by Texans in Texas; (hell) the word “Texas” is in the title.”  The argument worked, and by filibuster or force of will Joe Bob and I convinced the others as to the “essential” nature of the film.  From the villains (both Ed Neil and Gunnar Hansen for that matter) to the grim, grisly sets to the electrifying sound design, THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE delivers the most potent scares of any film of the modern era and has influenced every subsequent horror film in its massive wake.  When I want true terror in my desert island movie viewing, I will turn to the saw.  The saw is family. (Tim League)

Included on Programmers Top 100